Michelle, Author at On Fire Marketing
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Author: Michelle

We're on the hunt for a fantastic freelancer! Michelle's off on maternity leave soon and we need an extra pair of hands to keep our clients' social media in tip-top shape! You'll be needed for between two & four days per week from Oct 21st 2019 through to the end of the year (although we may need you a bit longer than that!). Take a look at the job description below and get in touch if you think it's for you! Job Title: Social Media Account Manager (Freelance) Location: Oldham, Greater Manchester Hours: 2-4 days per week Rate: Negotiable Dates required: Oct 21st - Dec 20th 2019 (approximate) Reports To: Managing Director About On Fire Marketing We’re not like other marketing agencies, we do things differently. We’re a micro agency, and we work only with small, independent businesses, to support their online marketing – whether it’s running their Facebook page...

You’re on a date. You’ve put in the leg work, you know a bit about them and had a snoop at their Facebook to see what they like. You talk about you and what you do, but they just don’t seem interested. Sound familiar? Loads of small businesses have focussed for years on building those lovely, shiny follower and like numbers and are now left feeling unloved, feeling like they’re talking to a brick wall. What’s gone wrong? Echo chamber The clue is in the world ‘social’ really, unlike more traditional forms of marketing, social media is a two-way street. Constantly shouting about how awesome you are and the fantastic new product you’ve designed isn’t enough to be heard amongst the cacophony of other tweets and posts – plus you’ll only sound like you’re bragging and no one likes that. We’re not just...

In a highly competitive and noisy market, making your brand stand out above the rest and resonate with its target audience is the Holy Grail. Humanising your brand and making it appeal to your audience is key to building powerful relationships and displaying your brand values. One great way to humanise your business is through storytelling… What is brand storytelling? Brand storytelling is an effective way to communicate with your customers. It taps into their emotions by doing more than simply selling products. One theory about why humans learned to speak states that it was to share stories and gossip as much as it was to learn how to say “Look out for that woolly mammoth…”. Your business is a rich vein of stories and anecdotes, but it’s easy to get caught up in ‘selling products’ and forget about the history and people...

If you Google ‘social media’, you’ll find a raft of articles about how it’s damaging to mental health, making us anti-social, turning us into insular zombies and stopping us from going and playing outside. In truth, social media is simply a convenient thing to blame for a number of problems, which are strikingly familiar to the issues said to be caused by television in the 70s and 80s – but as social media is now part of almost every aspect of our lives, the accusations levelled at it are likely to stick around. Not great news for brands using social media, right? Well, yes and no… Think positive Social media can be perceived as being very negative, thanks to internet trolls, hate speech, body shaming and any number of other examples. Many ordinary people can find themselves being sucked into quite negative speech patterns...

It's that time of year again! The Great British Bake Off is kicking off and the entire nation is perfecting their showstoppers so that when they finally post pictures of their cakes and bread to social media, they look perfect! What you don't usually see is the half a dozen much less pretty cakes just out of shot, along with the dog that's so stuffed full of cake that it keeps sneezing a cloud of icing sugar. The great thing for us is that now that just about every social media platform has effectively turned into a celebration of combining just the right elements in the right proportions to make something sweet, tasty or a showstopping spectacle and we can shamelessly brandjack the whole thing to show people exactly why you should approach your social media in exactly the same way...

Since environmental issues first gained widespread attention in the 1970s and 80s, when leaded petrol and chlorofluorocarbons in refrigerators were linked to the hole in the ozone layer, the choices people make have been more and more influenced by environmental and ethical choices. Although we have changed our language from the Greenhouse Effect to Global Warming to Climate Change, we’ve become much more aware of how our actions affect the planet. Purchase pressure has made several multi-national businesses change their ways for good; McDonald’s abandoned damaging polystyrene packs for recyclable card a very long time ago, mainly due to public pressure and negative PR. So many brands want to be seen as environmentally friendly that many have taken the dubious (and frankly dangerous) tactic of ‘greenwashing’, pretending to be green when in reality, you’re not. Trying to bluff your green credentials...

Since Mark Zuckerberg invited 250 of the top advertising and marketing executives to Facebook around ten years ago, companies have been heavily involved in social media. At the time, Facebook’s turnover was about $150m a year (which they now make in less than two days) and people were concerned that making money via Facebook would be too difficult. Zuckerberg’s pitch worked, and everybody from Coca-Cola to Blockbuster Video signed up. Since then we’ve seen multiple social networks launch, most notably Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, Snapchat and Google+; it’s entirely unsurprising that a lot of companies don’t feel like they can maintain a presence on every social network and actually get something out of it. It seems, however, that a lot of companies are writing off Instagram as ‘not worth it’ without thinking about how worth it it could be! Audience Firstly, don’t misunderstand Instagram’s...

Ask any business why they use social media and the majority would say “to make sales”. That’s fine and fair enough, your business needs to make sales in order to survive, but this laser-focused sales effort is probably doing the exact opposite of what you want it to. The clue’s in the name Social media. Your business accounts shouldn’t be an echo chamber of offers, stockists and prices. By focussing entirely on sales you’re alienating the very audience whose attention you want to attract. The internet is filled with adverts and pop-ups, which p*ss people off no end (believe us we’re on the net 9+ hours a day and they’re a huge pain), their social channels are a place for conversation, entertainment, fun and often a source of news too. Unlike TV ads, consumers can pick and choose the messages they want to...

So, Instagram’s latest update includes a new feature called ‘stories’. To anyone who has ever used Snapchat this will feel remarkably familiar, as it’s almost identical to the stories feature which launched on the app three years ago. For those of you not sure, ‘stories’ allows users to build a chain of content, be it photos or videos, that can be viewed over a 24hr period before they expire. A bit of history To understand the significance of this move, we need a little history lesson. Let’s go back to early 2012, when Carly Rae Jepsen was number one and London was gearing up to host the Olympics; Facebook saw the potential in Instagram, which at the time only had 30million users, and bought it for a whopping $1bn. Then 18months later, in its continuing quest for world domination, Facebook tried to buy...

We all have that one friend that will tell you, even when you feel like absolute s**t, “You’ve never looked better!” We know it’s a load of rubbish, but for a few seconds it’s nice to feel a little bit warm and fuzzy, despite doing you no actual good. Well, exactly the same can be said for social media vanity metrics! Vanity metrics are things like the number of likes or followers you have on your account and they tend to be what small businesses concentrate on when analysing social media. Looking at the numbers going up is a nice pat on the back and shows that there’s an audience interested in what you have to say – and while that’s not to be sniffed at – it’s akin to having a bricks and mortar shop on the High Street. There...