Social Media Archives - On Fire Marketing
89
archive,category,category-social-media,category-89,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode_grid_1300,footer_responsive_adv,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.0.1,vc_responsive

Social Media

Since Mark Zuckerberg invited 250 of the top advertising and marketing executives to Facebook around ten years ago, companies have been heavily involved in social media. At the time, Facebook’s turnover was about $150m a year (which they now make in less than two days) and people were concerned that making money via Facebook would be too difficult. Zuckerberg’s pitch worked, and everybody from Coca-Cola to Blockbuster Video signed up. Since then we’ve seen multiple social networks launch, most notably Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, Snapchat and Google+; it’s entirely unsurprising that a lot of companies don’t feel like they can maintain a presence on every social network and actually get something out of it. It seems, however, that a lot of companies are writing off Instagram as ‘not worth it’ without thinking about how worth it it could be! Audience Firstly, don’t misunderstand Instagram’s...

Ask any business why they use social media and the majority would say “to make sales”. That’s fine and fair enough, your business needs to make sales in order to survive, but this laser-focused sales effort is probably doing the exact opposite of what you want it to. The clue’s in the name Social media. Your business accounts shouldn’t be an echo chamber of offers, stockists and prices. By focussing entirely on sales you’re alienating the very audience whose attention you want to attract. The internet is filled with adverts and pop-ups, which p*ss people off no end (believe us we’re on the net 9+ hours a day and they’re a huge pain), their social channels are a place for conversation, entertainment, fun and often a source of news too. Unlike TV ads, consumers can pick and choose the messages they want to...

It’s a word that’s become ubiquitous over the last few years… Twitterstorm. If you don’t know what it means, it’s the unleashing of a collective anger on social media against a person, group or company. It usually follows something distasteful or offensive that gets noticed, gains momentum online, starts trending and voila! Twitterstorm. There have been loads over the years, but there were two in quick succession this year, United Airlines forcibly removing and injuring a paying passenger and Kendall Jenner’s Pepsi ad. If you’ve not seen the Pepsi commercial, the story is simple. A culturally diverse group of creative people, such as a cellist and photojournalist come together in protest. Along the way, the aforementioned cellist with impossibly good looks winks at Kendall Jenner, who happens to be on a nearby photoshoot. Jenner joins the protest that runs into a...

So, Instagram’s latest update includes a new feature called ‘stories’. To anyone who has ever used Snapchat this will feel remarkably familiar, as it’s almost identical to the stories feature which launched on the app three years ago. For those of you not sure, ‘stories’ allows users to build a chain of content, be it photos or videos, that can be viewed over a 24hr period before they expire. A bit of history To understand the significance of this move, we need a little history lesson. Let’s go back to early 2012, when Carly Rae Jepsen was number one and London was gearing up to host the Olympics; Facebook saw the potential in Instagram, which at the time only had 30million users, and bought it for a whopping $1bn. Then 18months later, in its continuing quest for world domination, Facebook tried to buy...

So the EU Referendum’s been and (definitely not) gone, and we saw a huge variety of approaches taken by businesses when it came to discussing the topic on their social media channels… Many global corporations made their stances clear months ago, with the likes of Virgin, Wetherspoon’s and EasyJet all garnering a great deal of press attention over their choice. For businesses with political clout, this makes sense; what’s of particular interest however, is that these views didn’t make it onto their social media channels. Why politics, social media and business don’t mix There is no hard and fast rule as to whether you should avoid politics altogether on your corporate social media channels, but there are a number of things to take into consideration first… 1. Does this affect my business? In the case of the EU Referendum a large number of company owners...

We all have that one friend that will tell you, even when you feel like absolute s**t, “You’ve never looked better!” We know it’s a load of rubbish, but for a few seconds it’s nice to feel a little bit warm and fuzzy, despite doing you no actual good. Well, exactly the same can be said for social media vanity metrics! Vanity metrics are things like the number of likes or followers you have on your account and they tend to be what small businesses concentrate on when analysing social media. Looking at the numbers going up is a nice pat on the back and shows that there’s an audience interested in what you have to say – and while that’s not to be sniffed at – it’s akin to having a bricks and mortar shop on the High Street. There...

Unless you’ve been sleeping under a rock or have been on an Arctic expedition over the past few weeks, you’ll likely know all about the #Instaupdate. Without going into it massively in depth, the simple story is that Instagram are moving towards algorithmic feeds – rather than chronological ones – just like their parent company, Facebook. If you are recently returned from the North Pole you can find out more about the changes here. This announcement caused mild (read: MAJOR) panic in the Instagram community, from bloggers/models/ brands/celebrities panicking that their posts would no longer be seen by a large percentage of their followers, resulting in a drop in engagement/RGs/sales/breaking-the-internet. The solution? Asking followers to ‘Turn on notifications’. Cue a deluge of posts all requesting the same thing. The idea is that by turning on notifications, followers receive a little orange prompt...

If you've been on Twitter recently, you've probably seen some reaction to Twitter's 'algorithmic timeline' announcement. The reaction has been overwhelmingly negative, although it could be that those who like it or don't care are too frightened to speak up! The real question is “what is going on?” For those unsure, it's simply that Twitter is considering changing how you see updates. Currently, tweets appear in a constantly updating stream with the most recent at the top, but Twitter is thinking of using an automatic process – the algorithm – to decide what's most relevant and move it to the top of your feed. Tweets deemed unimportant are moved down or potentially moved out of your timeline altogether. Why would Twitter do such a thing? For Twitter, it makes a lot of sense. Since it launched, people have loved short, sharp updates delivered in...

There are a number of things that people get passionate about, ranging from stamp collecting to Star Trek to One Direction. Incurring the wrath of a 'philatelist' (the posh name for a stamp collector) won't cause any worries and can easily be swatted away, along with the heavy sarcasm favoured by Trekkies. One Directioners are a little scarier on mass when you upset them, but apart from the odd egg thrown at your window, they shouldn't affect you or your business. The problem comes when your business depends on passionate people and you do something instantly offensive to almost every single one of them.   For those unaware, we at On Fire count ourselves as part of the craft beer community, which as a group, sits somewhere between Trekkies and Beliebers. For huge numbers of craft beer fans, big breweries are akin...