Michelle, Author at On Fire Marketing
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Author: Michelle

Since Mark Zuckerberg invited 250 of the top advertising and marketing executives to Facebook around ten years ago, companies have been heavily involved in social media. At the time, Facebook’s turnover was about $150m a year (which they now make in less than two days) and people were concerned that making money via Facebook would be too difficult. Zuckerberg’s pitch worked, and everybody from Coca-Cola to Blockbuster Video signed up. Since then we’ve seen multiple social networks launch, most notably Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, Snapchat and Google+; it’s entirely unsurprising that a lot of companies don’t feel like they can maintain a presence on every social network and actually get something out of it. It seems, however, that a lot of companies are writing off Instagram as ‘not worth it’ without thinking about how worth it it could be! Audience Firstly, don’t misunderstand Instagram’s...

Ask any business why they use social media and the majority would say “to make sales”. That’s fine and fair enough, your business needs to make sales in order to survive, but this laser-focused sales effort is probably doing the exact opposite of what you want it to. The clue’s in the name Social media. Your business accounts shouldn’t be an echo chamber of offers, stockists and prices. By focussing entirely on sales you’re alienating the very audience whose attention you want to attract. The internet is filled with adverts and pop-ups, which p*ss people off no end (believe us we’re on the net 9+ hours a day and they’re a huge pain), their social channels are a place for conversation, entertainment, fun and often a source of news too. Unlike TV ads, consumers can pick and choose the messages they want to...

So, Instagram’s latest update includes a new feature called ‘stories’. To anyone who has ever used Snapchat this will feel remarkably familiar, as it’s almost identical to the stories feature which launched on the app three years ago. For those of you not sure, ‘stories’ allows users to build a chain of content, be it photos or videos, that can be viewed over a 24hr period before they expire. A bit of history To understand the significance of this move, we need a little history lesson. Let’s go back to early 2012, when Carly Rae Jepsen was number one and London was gearing up to host the Olympics; Facebook saw the potential in Instagram, which at the time only had 30million users, and bought it for a whopping $1bn. Then 18months later, in its continuing quest for world domination, Facebook tried to buy...

We all have that one friend that will tell you, even when you feel like absolute s**t, “You’ve never looked better!” We know it’s a load of rubbish, but for a few seconds it’s nice to feel a little bit warm and fuzzy, despite doing you no actual good. Well, exactly the same can be said for social media vanity metrics! Vanity metrics are things like the number of likes or followers you have on your account and they tend to be what small businesses concentrate on when analysing social media. Looking at the numbers going up is a nice pat on the back and shows that there’s an audience interested in what you have to say – and while that’s not to be sniffed at – it’s akin to having a bricks and mortar shop on the High Street. There...

If you've been on Twitter recently, you've probably seen some reaction to Twitter's 'algorithmic timeline' announcement. The reaction has been overwhelmingly negative, although it could be that those who like it or don't care are too frightened to speak up! The real question is “what is going on?” For those unsure, it's simply that Twitter is considering changing how you see updates. Currently, tweets appear in a constantly updating stream with the most recent at the top, but Twitter is thinking of using an automatic process – the algorithm – to decide what's most relevant and move it to the top of your feed. Tweets deemed unimportant are moved down or potentially moved out of your timeline altogether. Why would Twitter do such a thing? For Twitter, it makes a lot of sense. Since it launched, people have loved short, sharp updates delivered in...