Dave, Author at On Fire Marketing
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Author: Dave

It’s a word that’s become ubiquitous over the last few years… Twitterstorm. If you don’t know what it means, it’s the unleashing of a collective anger on social media against a person, group or company. It usually follows something distasteful or offensive that gets noticed, gains momentum online, starts trending and voila! Twitterstorm. There have been loads over the years, but there were two in quick succession this year, United Airlines forcibly removing and injuring a paying passenger and Kendall Jenner’s Pepsi ad. If you’ve not seen the Pepsi commercial, the story is simple. A culturally diverse group of creative people, such as a cellist and photojournalist come together in protest. Along the way, the aforementioned cellist with impossibly good looks winks at Kendall Jenner, who happens to be on a nearby photoshoot. Jenner joins the protest that runs into a...

Well, it’s that time of year again… John Lewis are about to fire the Christmas starting gun with their festive advert. It’s now such an annual event that this year has seen ‘teasers’ featuring a dog watching a child jump on furniture with the hashtag #bouncebounce. There are already thousands of hours’ worth of blogs and opinion pages on why John Lewis’ ads are so successful, but there’s something else to consider. Their seasonal campaign avoids retail, purchasing and consumerism; instead it feels like a video mood board of heartfelt positivity, tied to a stripped-down piano track to stir up the fuzzy feelings. The most unfortunate side-effect of these ads has been… the imitators. The key to John Lewis’ success is side-stepping vulgar ‘Buy It Now!’ messages and connecting with abstract festive positivity. The problem is that in doing something well, others...

It’s that time of year again! Despite strawberries at Wimbledon, the Euros and the odd smattering of barbecue-suitable sunshine, something inconceivable is about to happen. Whether you’re about to get an email asking you to confirm your attendance at the Christmas Party or you notice that Channel 5 is inexplicably showing Home Alone or It’s A Wonderful Life, the first hint of Christmas is about to turn up. While for most of us, it’s about as welcome as the proverbial flatulence in an elevator, what’s odd is that people get quite excited about the mention of the Christmas party and Channel 5 gets good viewing figures for Christmas movies. The people who love Christmas this much are generally viewed with suspicion and irritation to the rest of us, but at this pretend festive period, spare a thought for the marketers. The build-up...

Using your own social media is pretty much simplicity itself. We all know how to use each different social network; Facebook is for general updates for everyone from your grandmother to your high school sweetheart, Twitter is for current events and general arguing, Instagram is for food/drinks/pets/bragging and LinkedIn is for… well, nobody’s fully sure, but Microsoft just paid loads of money for it. Running your own social media presence is absolutely fine, but to this day many businesses – especially small businesses – don’t quite grasp that using social media as a brand is not only a little more complex, but a totally different ball game. There still persists a viewpoint that a company profile can be used in exactly the same way that a personal account can. Company social media updates aren’t just representing the views or opinions of one...

So the EU Referendum’s been and (definitely not) gone, and we saw a huge variety of approaches taken by businesses when it came to discussing the topic on their social media channels… Many global corporations made their stances clear months ago, with the likes of Virgin, Wetherspoon’s and EasyJet all garnering a great deal of press attention over their choice. For businesses with political clout, this makes sense; what’s of particular interest however, is that these views didn’t make it onto their social media channels. Why politics, social media and business don’t mix There is no hard and fast rule as to whether you should avoid politics altogether on your corporate social media channels, but there are a number of things to take into consideration first… 1. Does this affect my business? In the case of the EU Referendum a large number of company owners...

Unless you’ve been sleeping under a rock or have been on an Arctic expedition over the past few weeks, you’ll likely know all about the #Instaupdate. Without going into it massively in depth, the simple story is that Instagram are moving towards algorithmic feeds – rather than chronological ones – just like their parent company, Facebook. If you are recently returned from the North Pole you can find out more about the changes here. This announcement caused mild (read: MAJOR) panic in the Instagram community, from bloggers/models/ brands/celebrities panicking that their posts would no longer be seen by a large percentage of their followers, resulting in a drop in engagement/RGs/sales/breaking-the-internet. The solution? Asking followers to ‘Turn on notifications’. Cue a deluge of posts all requesting the same thing. The idea is that by turning on notifications, followers receive a little orange prompt...

If you’ve seen the news recently, you’ve probably noticed a bit of a backlash on a Government update to teachers instructing them on best practice for teaching young children how to use exclamation marks. In principle, many people support the idea, imagining that it would do something to curb the perceived ‘interminable internet speak’ of the younger generation, who use sentences such as “OMG! Totes just bought bagels!!!” and other such drivel. The main problem is, however, that the advice from Government was completely wrong! In short, teachers were told that pupils should only be marked as ‘correct’ if the exclamation mark is used in a clause that begins ‘how’ or ‘what’. The general response from teachers was “What a load of insert colourful swearword!” – at least allowing them to mark their own derisive comments as correct using the relevant punctuation. Teachers...

There are a number of things that people get passionate about, ranging from stamp collecting to Star Trek to One Direction. Incurring the wrath of a 'philatelist' (the posh name for a stamp collector) won't cause any worries and can easily be swatted away, along with the heavy sarcasm favoured by Trekkies. One Directioners are a little scarier on mass when you upset them, but apart from the odd egg thrown at your window, they shouldn't affect you or your business. The problem comes when your business depends on passionate people and you do something instantly offensive to almost every single one of them.   For those unaware, we at On Fire count ourselves as part of the craft beer community, which as a group, sits somewhere between Trekkies and Beliebers. For huge numbers of craft beer fans, big breweries are akin...